Tag Archives: interviews

Interviews Done!

So, two weeks and 17 interviews later, I’ve finally finished interviewing the staff at NEJ.  Some people dropped out or didn’t sign up to begin with,  which was something I hadn’t had real experience with before – people are nervous about getting in front of a camera. Having always done university projects with other media students who were pretty used to it, I underestimated The Fear of the Lens (cheesy horror movie anyone?).

This also affected people who had done the interviews – it was a challenge to get them feeling comfortable enough to give natural answers. There was a really magic moment when one of the guys, who was extremely nervous about being on camera, just for a moment forgot that he was and delivered one of the best lines of the week. That was a great feeling.

You’re very aware that these people are placing trust in you to show them in a good light, overcoming their own fears about being in front of the camera. It’s a humbling responsibility.

My ingest and file management has also greatly improved. Having never handled content on this scale before, I made sure to set out folders and a workflow for getting the footage ingested into Premiere.

The scale of this also meant I’ve had to transcribe all the interviews and do a paper edit prior to actual editing, a skill which I gained from my time with Atlas of the Future doing Meaning Conference transcribings. Quickly seeing the benefits of being able to go through and highlight the best parts and more easily visualise how they can fit together. It is melting my brain though.

And because I love a gif, here’s some of me setting up and then packing up in the workshop:

 

Foiled by a spindle moulder

Sooo, some stuff went wrong and I had to change my plans.

I spent the whole of yesterday setting up for the workshop interviews, only to find out the machine right next to my set would be being used until Tuesday. How I only found this out after hours of prep I don’t know, but its been an excruciating lesson in Sod’s law – ‘If it can go wrong, it will’.

My contingency was to interview the office employees, which meant finding a new location and all the challenges that posed.

I’m going to say this now, and until experiencing it myself I wasn’t able to fully appreciate it:

SOLO SHOOTS ARE REALLY HARD

Like the animals on Noah’s ark, my kit came in pairs. Having to set up a  camera, mic and light by yourself is not ideal at the best of times, but when each is multiplied by two it pushes you to the limits of your skill set. Nevertheless, I’m really grateful for the opportunity it has provided me to push myself. It’s a challenge having your motivation coming from the same source as your frustrations and problems, the overcoming of which is invaluable in all aspects of life.

One of my favourite tasks of the day was having the sound-proof the cupboard behind my camera which, after getting the guys in the workshop to turn their music down, I discovered housed a large and rather noisy server.

To get an idea of the noise prior to my handywork, hum moderately loudly until someone nearby smacks you.

Eventually I managed to get Ed, one of the managers from upstairs, to come down and be the guinea pig for my first (ever) solo interview. It was a really good run, by which I mean I found out a lot of the problems I hadn’t known about before I hit record.

Watching the footage back, I’m really pleased with how it turned out. My next challenge is going to be matching up the colours of the Canon and Blackmagic footage (which I *think* involves something to do with LUT).

Watch this space!

Workshop interviews

Having found a good location in the workshop, today I did a test setup to figure out any issues before the actual run. The first, I discovered, is that its quite very difficult to frame an interview shot without a person sitting in the chair. Not wanting to disturb the employees, who all looked very busy and were often holding something sharp, I was forced to run back and forth from the camera to the chair to make adjustments. I got there in the end and the resulting GIF which you see before you outlines my process of tightening up the shot, adding props to fill out the background and bringing in some lighting. (I apologise for looking so bleak, probably just sad that all the bees are dying)

This will change slightly from person to person as I adjust the lighting and focal length to accentuate their features, but it’s been really useful to get a feel for the space. It’s also allowed me to block out tripod and lighting positions like so:

Here’s a pic of the setup minus your’s truly. Hoping to start the interviews tomorrow, so we’ll see how it goes!

The silence of the tools

So now I’ve been with N.E.J. Stevenson Ltd a few weeks, I’m ready to start prepping for interviews. Most of the work I’ve done prior to this has been action based – filming around the workshop and an installation in London.

I wanted to hold off conducting interviews with the employees because I feel it’s important to establish a rapport, allowing the interviewees to feel more comfortable with me behind the camera and so able to give more natural answers.

I also wanted to wait a few weeks because I was still getting to grips with my kit (tools don’t tend to laugh at you when you mess up, unlike their human counterparts) and the complexities of solo- shooting.

Last thing before I start is to consult the fountain of knowledge that is Lynda.com on how to conduct professional interviews. A good tip I picked up from the course is a simple list of things to tell your interviewee before turning on the camera:

  1. Don’t look into the camera, this is just a normal conversation between the two of us.
  2. Include the question in your answer using full sentences.
  3. It’s okay to restart questions or rephrase your answer.
  4. Can I get you anything before we start?

If you’re interested in learning more about interview techniques, you can view the Lynda course I’m using here.