Tag Archives: interviewing

Interviews Done!

So, two weeks and 17 interviews later, I’ve finally finished interviewing the staff at NEJ.  Some people dropped out or didn’t sign up to begin with,  which was something I hadn’t had real experience with before – people are nervous about getting in front of a camera. Having always done university projects with other media students who were pretty used to it, I underestimated The Fear of the Lens (cheesy horror movie anyone?).

This also affected people who had done the interviews – it was a challenge to get them feeling comfortable enough to give natural answers. There was a really magic moment when one of the guys, who was extremely nervous about being on camera, just for a moment forgot that he was and delivered one of the best lines of the week. That was a great feeling.

You’re very aware that these people are placing trust in you to show them in a good light, overcoming their own fears about being in front of the camera. It’s a humbling responsibility.

My ingest and file management has also greatly improved. Having never handled content on this scale before, I made sure to set out folders and a workflow for getting the footage ingested into Premiere.

The scale of this also meant I’ve had to transcribe all the interviews and do a paper edit prior to actual editing, a skill which I gained from my time with Atlas of the Future doing Meaning Conference transcribings. Quickly seeing the benefits of being able to go through and highlight the best parts and more easily visualise how they can fit together. It is melting my brain though.

And because I love a gif, here’s some of me setting up and then packing up in the workshop:

 

The silence of the tools

So now I’ve been with N.E.J. Stevenson Ltd a few weeks, I’m ready to start prepping for interviews. Most of the work I’ve done prior to this has been action based – filming around the workshop and an installation in London.

I wanted to hold off conducting interviews with the employees because I feel it’s important to establish a rapport, allowing the interviewees to feel more comfortable with me behind the camera and so able to give more natural answers.

I also wanted to wait a few weeks because I was still getting to grips with my kit (tools don’t tend to laugh at you when you mess up, unlike their human counterparts) and the complexities of solo- shooting.

Last thing before I start is to consult the fountain of knowledge that is Lynda.com on how to conduct professional interviews. A good tip I picked up from the course is a simple list of things to tell your interviewee before turning on the camera:

  1. Don’t look into the camera, this is just a normal conversation between the two of us.
  2. Include the question in your answer using full sentences.
  3. It’s okay to restart questions or rephrase your answer.
  4. Can I get you anything before we start?

If you’re interested in learning more about interview techniques, you can view the Lynda course I’m using here.