Category Archives: WitMI

Job Interviews

So over the past few weeks, we’ve been preparing for a simulated job application to put all the skills gained from our Work in the Media Industries module to the test, which I talked about in a previous post. On Wednesday we finally got to run through the actual interviews.

I was one of the two people chosen for the interview stage. We were applying for an assistant cameraman role at a company called ‘Pink Pig Productions’. I had been sure to tailor my CV to illustrate my camera skills, and made sure to brush up on the job description before the interview. It was an interesting experience, even though it was a role-play I was surprisingly nervous. The actual interview went well, I managed to answer all the questions well and even surprised the interviewers with some knowledge about the company (which admittedly I memorised whilst waiting outside). The exercise was useful, but in a way the second part was even more so.

The second part was conducting interviews. Josh and I ran them, and had drawn up a series of questions and subsequent criteria to mark the candidates on. It was actually quite fun interviewing people, and sitting on the other side of the table I realised with much greater clarity that interviewers are just people.

The whole experience was very educational, I definitely feel more confident in my interview abilities as a result of it.

 

Searching for Excalibur

As I continue to write these blog posts I have come to understand their value as a way of processing my own thoughts and opinions. As such, I am using this post to compile my initial impressions from research for my Work in the Media Industries report. It should be made clear now that this post does not represent a full and knowledgeable understanding of its subject matter, but rather the first impressions of an initiate media producer which will develop as I delve deeper into the topic.

I recently started listening to Cal Newport’s ‘Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World’ on audiobook and, although it doesn’t focus specifically on media workers, it does offer some insight as to why so many are drawn to the unpredictable industry. Newport talks about an American blacksmith who forges medieval swords using techniques of their era. He describes how the smith, using an ingot no larger than 4 or 5 iPhones stacked on top of one another, slowly hammers out the steel into a thin blade, reheating the metal after each deft blow in a painstaking process which takes several hours.

The anecdote illustrates an increasingly widespread problem that faces knowledge workers across the globe – where is their sword? Many struggle to see the physical impact their work has on the world; lost in a network of emails and meetings, their ‘sword’ is far less tangible than the gleaming length of steel produced by the blacksmith. Without this palpable definition to their work, it can be harder to find real job satisfaction.

This is one of the reasons I believe people are drawn to the creative industry. In his book ‘Nice Work If You Can Get It: Life and Labor in Precarious Times’ Andrew Ross outlines what he calls the “heavy sacrificial cost” of job gratification for creatives. Among this sobering list of traits is “self-exploitation in response to the gift of autonomy, and dispensability in exchange for flexibility”. Progressively sophisticated workflows have allowed corporations to chop projects into small chunks and outsource them, creating a temporary employment culture which the creative industry is infamous for. Yet these are the conditions which throngs of people are drawn to.

In a world where your profession has become an increasingly integral part of what defines you, the social prestige associated with working in the creative industry has outweighed the very real insecurities which face media workers today. The concept of high-risk/high-reward employment has become exciting rather than foolhardy, as people struggle to find their sword.

 

Work in the Media Industries

As part of our ‘Work in the Media Industries’ unit, we were required to design a job spec and person profile around an imaginary entry-level media job of our choice. It was a good exercise in helping me get in the mind of employers and see what sort of things they are looking for.  It was also somewhat terrifying.

We had to apply to one group’s job spec and received CV’s for our role from another. In the seminar today we went through the CV’s we’d received, scanning through them to see how well they fit the criteria we had set out and shortlisting the best. Although untrained and potentially not as thorough as the HR departments within the industry, I realised a number of harsh truths about the application process:

  1. Your CV will be skimmed – HR has to go through 1000’s of CV’s and can’t afford to do much more than skim them for the criteria.
  2. Meet the job spec in your CV  – If you aren’t meeting any of the criteria within the first few lines, your chance of getting through declines quite sharply.
  3. Conciseness is key – If I got bored after reading 5 CV’s, how do you think someone in HR feels after 500? Don’t waste their time with indulgent paragraphs of info, stick to the 1-page rule as best you can, spilling into 2 if you think it absolutely necessary.
  4. Back up your statements with clear evidence – Picture it, a generic “I’m a strong team-player who works well with others” line, being read for the 100th time by HR. As I read through some of these lines in the CV’s I found myself saying ‘So what?’ more than I’d like. Avoid the ‘So What’ Effect by giving hard evidence to back up your points.
  5. You NEED outside experience – A degree is no longer a guarantee of employment. Having outside experience in the industry, even just weekend and runner jobs, will make you stand out above the beyond the rest.

Number 5 is something that has rung particularly true with me. I had a great First Year in terms of social life and ‘getting the grades’, but to be honest it was a bit of a passenger year. I realise now that I need to get out there and start making stuff, getting some real experience under my belt and building up a portfolio to give me the best chance of making it in this industry. It’s an exciting time, but also pretty scary. I’ve got a couple of projects in the pipelines and I look forward to sharing them with you on here.